Script For ‘Homosexuality In Singapore’

I would acknowledge that ‘Homosexuality In Singapore’ my most recent and popular video, has the best written script in my videos by far. So here it is, I am releasing it to the public. Read it, sha…

Source: Script For ‘Homosexuality In Singapore’

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Tian Wai You Tian

天外有天

“Tian Wai You Tian” is a Chinese proverb (Chengyu) that translates roughly to “There are Skies Beyond Skies.”On the one hand, the expression implies limitless possibility; universes beyond what we currently conceive and the grandeur of new experiences… On the other hand, the proverb is often used in Chinese culture to admonish the prideful. The expression also means that no matter how good you think  you are; how knowledgeable you imagine yourself to be; there will be someone or something greater, brighter and more knowledgeable out there.

Given the dynamism of today’s world, I think this sentiment perfectly captures the particular combination of wonder and humility with which I hope to convey my experiences in Asia.

Stay tuned for more updates!

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Martingale

A martingale is any of a class of betting strategies that originated from and were popular in 18th century France. The simplest of these strategies was designed for a game in which the gambler wins his stake if a coin comes up heads and loses it if the coin comes up tails. The strategy had the gambler double his bet after every loss, so that the first win would recover all previous losses plus win a profit equal to the original stake. The martingale strategy has been applied to roulette as well, as the probability of hitting either red or black is close to 50%.

Since a gambler with infinite wealth will, almost surely, eventually flip heads, the martingale betting strategy was seen as a sure thing by those who advocated it. Of course, none of the gamblers in fact possessed infinite wealth, and the exponential growth of the bets would eventually bankrupt “unlucky” gamblers who chose to use the martingale. The gambler usually wins a small net reward, thus appearing to have a sound strategy. However, the gambler’s expected value does indeed remain zero (or less than zero) because the small probability that he will suffer a catastrophic loss exactly balances with his expected gain. (In a casino, the expected value is negative, due to the house’s edge.) The likelihood of catastrophic loss may not even be very small. The bet size rises exponentially. This, combined with the fact that strings of consecutive losses actually occur more often than common intuition suggests, can bankrupt a gambler quickly.

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In Java, what’s the difference between an object and a class?

This kind of question is a test of your knowledge of the terminology associated with object oriented programming. You should note that this question could just as well be asked in the context of a C++ programmer interview, or any programming position that requires object oriented programming for that matter.

The terms ‘class’ and ‘object’ are definitely related to one another, but each term holds its own distinct meaning. Let’s start out by explaining what the term “class” means in the context of OOP. The term ‘class’ refers to the actual written piece of code which is used to define the behavior of any given class. So, a class is a static piece of code that consists of attributes which don’t change during the execution of a program – like the method definitions within a class.
An object is an instance of a class

The term ‘object’, however, refers to an actual instance of a class. Every object must belong to a class. Objects are created and eventually destroyed – so they only live in the program for a limited time. While objects are ‘living’ their properties may also be changed signficantly.

An example will help clarify what we’ve said. Suppose we have a class called ‘Animal’. All Animals have bodies and brains – and these could be the attributes of our fictional Animal class. We can also add some methods that would be common to all Animals – like “movement”, because all animals can move (maybe you can think of a better example for methods, but hopefully you get the point). So, the idea you really want to enforce in your own mind is that this very general ‘template’ of an Animal does not change – it’s simply just some lines of code that define the Animal class.

An instance of the Animal class would be a specific animal – like a lion, a cat, or a zebra. These instances of the Animal class would be called objects. Whereas the Animal class is a general concept, the instances of that class – the lions, cats, etc – take that general concept and create a real instance of it.

That is why programmers define constructors for their classes – so that when someone wants to create an object of the class, he/she can just pass in the actual properties that he/she wants the object to have – like what kind of animal it is, the name, the weight, etc. So, you can think of a constructor as something that brings the class to life – which is why it is called a constructor, because it constructs a specific instance of a class.
Objects have a lifespan but classes do not

And, as our Animal example clearly shows, every object has a lifespan associated with it – a cat or zebra can not live forever. And, the properties of those objects can change as well while they ‘live’; if we have a ‘size’ variable defined in the class that would of course change as the cat object grows bigger.
Object versus class summary

So, we can say that whereas a class is a general concept (like an Animal), an object is a very specific embodiment of that class, with a limited lifespan (like a lion, cat, or a zebra). Another way of thinking about the difference between a class and an object is that a class provides a template for something more specific that the programmer has to define, which he/she will do when creating an object of that class.

http://www.programmerinterview.com/index.php/java-questions/difference-between-object-and-class/

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http://www.math.hawaii.edu/%7Elee/education/index.html

http://www.math.hawaii.edu/%7Elee/education/index.html

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https://plus.maths.org/content/maths-minute-symmetry

https://plus.maths.org/content/maths-minute-symmetry

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love is what we are born to do

In 1981 Pope John Paul II wrote a letter on marriage and family life (Familiaris Consortio) built around the principle that human beings are made for love. Learning to give and receive love is not an option for us, John Paul II reasoned, but an unceasing need and an inescapable responsibility because it is what God brought us to life to do. Fashioned from love, we become ourselves in loving and being loved. We are, as biologists might put it, genetically wired to love. In more theological language, it is everyone’s lifetime vocation; it is what every human being is called to do. “God inscribed in the humanity of man and woman,” John Paul II wrote, “the vocation, and thus the capacity and responsibility, of love and communion. Love is therefore the fundamental and innate vocation of every human being.” Nobody escapes the call to love. I can run from it and spend my life contradicting it, but that will be a terribly expensive choice because I cannot erase the most persistent need of my nature. As Vincent Genovesi observes, “Because we are created for love, nothing else can fulfill us ultimately; lacking fulfillment, we cannot be truly happy. In light of our destiny, our only chance for lasting happiness is our persistent willingness to love.” This does not deny that loving well is hard work, or that there are sometimes deep hurts and unbearable losses in love. But it is hard to give up on love, and awfully hard to stop wanting to be loved, because giving and receiving love is what we are born to do: “Love is not an option for human beings, it is a requirement. It is the most profound statement of who we are.”

Happiness and the Christian Moral Life: An Introduction to Christian Ethics. By Paul J. Wadell

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